Amazonpcepcpcs mentorship program his secret obsession amazon

Amazonpcepcpcs mentorship program his secret obsession amazon
Nicolas Cole Instagram Having a mentor is more than an opportunity. A true mentorship is one filled with emotional invtment — a desire in the mentor to see their knowledge manift in another, and an ambition from the student to take each lesson to heart. In a true mentorship the student lea.rns and grows at a rapid rate, which is fulfilling to them, and the mentor sees a reflection of themselves, allowing them to further develop as they review some of their earlit lessons and challenges. A true mentorship is symbiotic. And that is why it is so rare. I have, for whatever reason, been fortunate to have multiple mentors in my life. When I was 17 years old, I had a mentor in the World of Warcraft to whom I credit my development as a gamer. He is the reason I ended up becoming one of the hight ranked players in North America. When I was 21 years old, I had a mentor at the gym who taught me everything about lifting weits. He was a powerlifter, and taught me much more than just how to bench or squat. He taught me how to approach the gym with a level of discipline and humility that ended up carrying over to other elements of my life. And when I turned 23 years old and started worng at an advertising agency and Think Tank in Chicago called Idea Booth , I found arguably the most influential mentor I have had to date Ron Gibori, a serial entrepreneur and creative director. What I lea.rned from Ron was one part industry related, one part self development focused, and one part refined rebellion that is the be way I can phrase it. As an experienced creative, it wasnt so much his worng knowledge of advertising or his mastery over the art of networng that rubbed off on me. It was his mindset. Here are seven perspective changing lessons Ive lea.rned from my latt mentorship. 1. There is always a third way. One of my first days worng at Idea Booth, Ron asked me to research how to get something posted for a brand within Flipboard. I poked around on Google for about 10 minutes and then came back to tell him, I looked, and its impossible. You can either do this, or this, but what youre aski for cant be done. He smiled and said, There is always a third way. Go find it. He was right. Twenty minutes later I figured it out. And to this day, whenever I fall into the trap of saying I cant figure it out, all he says is Flipboard, and I am reminded there is always another answer — a third way. 2. If someone likes your idea the first time you explain it, your idea isnt risky enough. Ive come to lea.rn that the ideas most quickly praised are actually some of my weakt ideas. People praise them because they make sense and dont push boundaries — they dont threaten anyone. This was something I didnt understand until I really started sharing my own ideas with the world. The valuable ideas are the ones people qution, because where there is a qution there is room to explore. The ideas that people immediately validate, that make them say Sure! Love it! are the safe ones, and tend to lack the risk needed to be truly influential and groundbreaking. 3. Titles are meaningless. This is a lesson I thought I had lea.rned earlier in life, but it needed to be lea.rned again. When I first started worng at Idea Booth, I fell into the trap of wanting more. I was a kid fresh out of college, and looked around at some of my peers who were in high paying positions and had fancy titles next to their names, and I wanted that. I wanted that feeling of validation. I wanted people to know I was successful. But whenever I would spend time with Ron, practically aski him how I could have my own title, his only response was, Titles dont matter. Focus on doing great wor.k instead. It took me a long time to understand how valuable that lesson is — and even more so, how many people use a title as a way to cover up how little they actually know. They let their title speak for them, instead of their ski.lls and worng knowledge. And they expect people to listen to them because of their title, not because of what they actively bring to the table. 4. Rewards are fleeting and do not bring fulfillment. Another thing I would do as an ambitious young creative was ogle the sports cars, nice clothes, and gorg.eous women who frequented the Chicago hot spots Ron would take me to. I would look around and say, I want that. I want that. I want that, to which Ron would say, If you judge your success off the things you have, you will never be fulfilled. Being a 23 year old staring at a jet black Ferrari parked outside of a fancy rtaurant, those words are not easy to encode. But I see now how much those words have stuck with me. Because once you get one reward, you want the next one, and the next one, and ultimately they lead nowhere. Real fulfillment comes from being in love with what you do, and always pushing yourself to create

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